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English

Professors: Drew-Bear, Easton, Kyler, Troost (chair)

Associate Professors: T. Fee, Harding, Mayer, McEvoy, Mulvania, Shiller, Verdun

Visiting Assistant Professor: Lewis

Lecturer: Hess

The English program aims to develop students who read with comprehension, insight, and appreciation; write with competence, grace, and authority; speak with clarity and confidence; and know about literature and literary history. It prepares them for careers that require cultural breadth, strong writing and research skills, and an ability to read, synthesize, and analyze written material.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: Ten courses, including ENG 263 , 290 , and 400 ; a survey course chosen from ENG 264 , 265 , or 266 ; four English courses at the 300-level; and two English courses, one of which must be numbered 200 or higher. No more than two Intersession courses may count for the major. The intensive freshman writing courses (currently ENG 111, ENG 112) required of all students do not count toward the major.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: Six courses, including a survey course chosen from ENG 263 , 264 , 265 , or 266 ; two other English courses at the 200-level; two English courses at the 300-level; one additional English course. No more than one Intersession course may count for the minor. Professional writing courses (ENG 200, 201, 202, 203, 301, and others as designated) do not count for the minor. The intensive freshman writing courses (currently ENG 111, ENG 112) do not count toward the minor.

Prerequisites for all courses may be waived with the written permission of the instructor.

In general, 100- and 200-level literature courses focus on developing skills in close reading and analytic writing while 300- and 400-level courses build on this foundation by asking students to engage responsibly with secondary sources or to employ sophisticated theoretical approaches. Professional and creative writing courses at the 200-level teach the fundamentals of writing in several genres while 300-level courses focus on developing a student's writing within a specific genre.

English majors contemplating graduate study in literature or writing should make their intentions known to their advisors, ideally in the sophomore or junior year. It would be wise to study one or two foreign languages through at least the second year and give thought to undertaking an independent study project or pursuing honors.

AP POLICY: Students who earn a score of 4 or 5 on the College Board's test in English language and composition receive credit for ENG 111; students who earn a score of 4 or 5 on the test in English literature receive credit for ENG 190 (but not HUM designation).

TEACHER CERTIFICATION: Students may seek Secondary Education (grades 7-12) Certification in English by completing the English major, the required English content area courses (ENG 200, ENG 302, COM 220, THR 152), and the Education minor consisting of those courses required for Secondary Education (grades 7-12) Certification. 

Students may seek Upper Elementary Education Certification (4-8) in Language Arts in one of two ways: Option 1: Complete the Child Development and Education major and the English minor (or major); Option 2: Complete the English major, the required English content area courses (ENG 200, ENG 302, COM 220, THR 152), and the Education minor consisting of those courses required for Upper Elementary Education (grades 4-8) Certification in Language Arts.

Before being formally admitted to either program, students must satisfy -- by the end of the sophomore year -- the Certification Program Requirements described in the Education (Teacher Certification) section of the catalog.

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